Lord Clive

Lord Clive

Read FREE!

Lord Clive

Lord Clive

Read FREE!

Excerpt

In the same year, 1744, war was declared between England and France. The two countries had taken opposite sides in the war of the Austrian succession; they had hitherto acted as auxiliaries, they were now to take part in it as principals. Ever since the death of the Emperor, Charles the Sixth, war had been imminent, and as early as 1741 the fertile brain of La Bourdonnais had conceived the idea of capturing Madras, and firmly establishing French predominance in India by assembling an overwhelming naval force in the Indian seas. During the continuance of peace the French governors of Pondicherry, MM. Dumas and Dupleix, made all possible preparation for the struggle; the English did nothing.

Early in the seventeenth century the English established a factory at Surat. In 1639 they founded Madras on a narrow strip of coast land, which they had acquired from the Rajah of Chandragiri. They occupied the position of zamindars, or permanent occupiers, and paid a fixed annual rental to the native ruler of the district. The French, Dutch, and Portuguese settlements were founded on lands held upon similar terms. The early history of Madras was a troubled one. The settlers were threatened alternately . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.