The Message of Greek Art

The Message of Greek Art

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The Message of Greek Art

The Message of Greek Art

Read FREE!

Excerpt

This is not a history of Greek art. Still less is it a record of personal research or exploration beyond the limits of previous knowledge. The writer is deeply conscious of the debt which he and others owe to the patient scholarship which has rescued from oblivion so much that he values, but he claims no part in the honor of this achievement. He has found in the civilization thus rescued a thing inspiring and enjoyable beyond any other. While sharing with scholars the regret that so much still remains unknown, he has even greater regret that the known is so inaccessible, that so few enjoy what he has found enjoyable or feel the inspiration which he has felt. This regret is the occasion of this book, and sufficiently suggests its purpose.

As the title of the book implies, the subject here chiefly discussed is Greek art, but with emphasis rather upon the adjective than upon the noun. The subject is never dissociated in thought from its great background of Greek civilization and history, and it derives its chief interest to the writer from the fact that it so constantly reveals and interprets this larger fact. It is therefore the message of Greek art, what it has to tell us of the Greeks, of their personality, their ideals and their experiences, that will chiefly concern us, rather than considerations of process or later accident.

By common consent the Greek civilization is the most remarkable that the world has ever known. If its supremacy is more relative than absolute, it is not the less significant. The Greeks . . .

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