Who Will Save Our Children? The Plight of the Jamaican Child in the 1990s

Who Will Save Our Children? The Plight of the Jamaican Child in the 1990s

Who Will Save Our Children? The Plight of the Jamaican Child in the 1990s

Who Will Save Our Children? The Plight of the Jamaican Child in the 1990s

Excerpt

Children are not safe and happy if their parents are miserable, and parents must be miserable if they cannot protect a home from poverty. Let us not deceive ourselves; The power to maintain a decent living standard is the primary essential of child welfare. (Julia Lathrop)

The rationale for a modern child welfare system is based on the fact that the human child is unique and experiences a prolonged period of dependence on adult care, for support and guidance. This is provided by the child's family, either both parents or one parent. When there is family breakdown, however, this care is provided by extended family members (for example, grandparents). However, over several decades, due to sociocultural and economic changes, many societies, including those in the Caribbean, have had to offer this back up function by setting up organized societal institutions to provide this alternative form of care through child welfare systems (Kadushin 1967). Child welfare systems function through various social agencies in the government, as well as in the non- government sector, to provide alternative care for children, as it is assumed that they are not intellectually, emotionally or physically able to care for themselves. It is therefore . . .

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