Japanese Expansion on the Asiatic Continent: A Study in the History of Japan with Special Reference to Her International Relations with China, Korea, and Russia - Vol. 1

Japanese Expansion on the Asiatic Continent: A Study in the History of Japan with Special Reference to Her International Relations with China, Korea, and Russia - Vol. 1

Japanese Expansion on the Asiatic Continent: A Study in the History of Japan with Special Reference to Her International Relations with China, Korea, and Russia - Vol. 1

Japanese Expansion on the Asiatic Continent: A Study in the History of Japan with Special Reference to Her International Relations with China, Korea, and Russia - Vol. 1

Excerpt

The present volume is the first of three which will be written on Japanese expansion on the continent of Asia. It covers the events up to the end of the sixteenth century, when Hideyoshi attempted to conquer all Asia. The second volume, the manuscript of which is now almost finished, will take the account Past the middle of the nineteenth century and will dwell especially upon the "Seclusion" period and its effect upon the future expansion of Japan. The third volume will begin with the emergence of the New Japan in 1868 and will close with Japan's self-establishment in Manchuria in 1932 and her preparation to make North China her new field of operation.

Each volume, like the present, will consist of a monographic text and an appendix of documents. Japanese, Chinese, and Korean documents, monographs, and standard histories have been utilized in their preparation and the key documents have been translated from the originals in the Oriental languages. Through a careful comparison and investigation of these materials, the writer has endeavored to present an account which is accurate and free from bias. It is his hope that thereby some light will be shed upon the conflicting and often puzzling international relationships existing in the Orient.

The concomitance of a Chinese empire existing more or less feebly, a Russia expanding eastward, and a Japan carrying on a continental expansion, was bound to bring about a conflict. It came to a head in the Russo-Japanese War (1904-05), which still remains one of the greatest wars fought between two nations. The end of this conflict is not yet in sight. The advance of Russia on the continent of Asia is a movement of recent centuries, but Japan's desire to expand on the continent has been manifested again and again for more than a thousand years. In the early centuries of her national life, Japan frequently came into conflict with China, Korea usually being the victim, until, finally, Korea found herself annexed to Japan. In more . . .

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