In Defense of Affirmative Action

In Defense of Affirmative Action

In Defense of Affirmative Action

In Defense of Affirmative Action

Synopsis

At a time when quotas and preferences are under attack nationwide, Barbara Bergmann courageously show that without the help of affirmative action America will never be able to attain a truly race-blind and sex-blind society, for it is naive to imagine that the abolition of affirmative action will lead to a system based solely on ability. Women and minorities do in fact need assistance in cases where prejudice or habit leads to preference for white males in all openings. Free of the posturing that has so often degraded this debate, In Defense of Affirmative Action is a clarion call to maintain affirmative action as a just and indispensable solution to a chronic problem in American society.

Excerpt

When Bill Clinton was campaigning for the presidency in 1992 as the candidate of the Democratic Party, he promised to appoint a cabinet that "looked like America." At the time Clinton made his rather poetic promise, nobody, including his political enemies, spoke out against it. Nobody said that attempting to fulfill that promise would be a bad idea.

A cabinet that really looks like the American labor force would have six of its fourteen seats filled by white and minority women and two of its seats filled by minority men. As Clinton's cabinet selection process was approaching its end in early 1993, only two of the appointments had gone to women. Feminist organizations . . .

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