Max Reinhardt and His Theatre

Max Reinhardt and His Theatre

Max Reinhardt and His Theatre

Max Reinhardt and His Theatre

Excerpt

Max Reinhardt has made his entry into the American theatre at the psychological moment. The strange fate which drove him from his native Austria to a career in Berlin more brilliant than any other metropolis could have provided for him and which sent him back home to Salzburg and Vienna three years ago to reap the riper fruits of a career and reputation already won, has brought him to our shores at a time when he can do more for our theatre than on any previous occasion. If he had come ten years ago, when the first proposal to bring him here was thwarted by the war, he would have received credit for many of the superficial ideas and innovations which others in the meantime have snatched, imitated, and usually misapplied. Coming today, he avoids all the false furore over non-essentials and stands for us as the personal embodiment of a living theatre.

On our part, he finds us safely through the adolescent period of obsession with trick scenic effects and ready to have our own native impulses toward a more vivid theatre crystallized by mature precept and example from abroad. As I have said in a previous work: "Something has happened to our American theatre. Not so long ago, it was a luxury, a pastime, an industry. Today, it is the most provocative of the arts. The art of the theatre in the midst of life, drawing new life therefrom. Something has . . .

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