Drama as Rhetoric/Rhetoric as Drama: An Exploration of Dramatic and Rhetorical Criticism

Drama as Rhetoric/Rhetoric as Drama: An Exploration of Dramatic and Rhetorical Criticism

Drama as Rhetoric/Rhetoric as Drama: An Exploration of Dramatic and Rhetorical Criticism

Drama as Rhetoric/Rhetoric as Drama: An Exploration of Dramatic and Rhetorical Criticism

Synopsis

This volume explores the fascinating aesthetic and social connectionbetween drama and rhetoric. Inasmuch as drama seeks to keep an audience engaged, it takes on rhetoricalqualities; likewise, rhetorical endeavor may employ dramatic appeal. Centuriesago, Aristotle's companion pieces The Rhetoric and The Poeticgenerated crosscurrents of critical thought about rhetorical and dramatictheory. Recently, such critic-theorists as Kenneth Burke, Ernest Bormann,Elder Olson, Paul de Man, and others have stirred up these currents afresh. The contributors to this volume take provocative new approaches to enduringissues.
• • • • Contents
• • • • PART I: Rhetorical Dimensions to the Drama: The Classical Context Enthymeme and the Invention of Troping in Greek Drama, August W. Staub Theorizing the Spectacle: A Rhetorical Analysis of Tragic Recognition,Tom Heeney Exile and the Kingdom: Reason as Nightmare in the Aeschylean Vision, John Arthos PART II: The Rhetorical in Renaissance and Neoclassical Drama Epideictic Pastoral: Rhetorical Tensions in the Staging of Torquato Tasso's Aminta, Maria Galli Stampino Shakespeare's Rhetoric versus the Ideologyof Ian McKellen's Richard III, George L. Geckle And Now for Application:Venice Preserv'd and the Rhetoric of Textual Application, Odai Johnson PART III: War, Politics, and the Drama Federalist and RepublicanTheatre in the 1790s, Steve Wilme Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Rhetoric of Gradualism, Charles Wilbanks Dario Fo's Angry Farce, Stanley Vincent Longman PART IV: Contemporary Culture Stain upon the Silence: Samuel Beckett's Deconstructive Inventions, Leigh Anne Howard Still Angry after All These Years: Performing the Language of HIV and the Marked Body in The Normal Heart and The Destiny of Me, Peter Michael Pober

Excerpt

This volume of the Theatre Symposium deals with a topic that has strong classical associations: the fascinating aesthetic and social connection between drama and rhetoric. The Greek world was fully alive to this connection, having begun to explore the terrain as early as the sixth century B.C. And naturally, one thinks immediately of fourth-century Aristotle, whose Rhetoric formed a tight companion to his Poetics. Interest in the shared issues between drama and rhetoric was renewed with the Renaissance, and indeed many of the ideas advanced by neoclassicism merge rhetorical concepts into dramatic theory. Yet the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries generally ignored the kinship between the two. In our own time, such theorists as Kenneth Burke, Ernest Bowman, Elder Olson, and Paul de Man have rekindled our interest in the rhetorical dimension of drama and in the dramatic nature of rhetoric. Both, after all, concern themselves with the process of affecting audiences. Both are founded on the notion of society, any audience being a compendium of its society, a public in miniature, whose gathering cannot help but imply the larger world existing outside the hall or theatre.

The papers appearing in this volume were selected from those originally presented at a conference held in Columbia at the University of South Carolina, April 19-21, 1996. That conference, organized and hosted by Charles Wilbanks and Steven Hart, both of the Department of Theatre, Speech and Dance of the University of South Carolina, occasioned a lively exchange of ideas among scholars from many different disciplines: speech communication, drama, English literature, comparative literature, classics, and romance languages and literature. The . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.