Intentions in Architecture

Intentions in Architecture

Intentions in Architecture

Intentions in Architecture

Excerpt

The present study has grown out of the concrete problems an architect encounters in his profession. We do not, in the first place, think of the technical difficulties which have to be surmounted in connection with any building task, but we rather have in mind the problem of defining the task, and of deciding whether a planned or completed solution is satisfactory. In both cases we have to take into consideration 'practical' and 'artistic' needs which concern the architect as well as society and the individual client. Today we lack a real basis for this procedure, and the result is a rather discouraging 'debate' where the parties talk at cross purposes without arriving at fruitful, mutually helpful approaches to the problem. In other words, we lack a satisfactory theory of architecture. Under the continual pressure of new demands, most professions have in our time had to develop comprehensive theoretical 'tools'. Our architectural solutions, however, are still the result of more or less accidental improvisations. The architects have shown themselves rather unwilling to work out a theoretical basis for their field, mostly because of the prejudice that theory kills the creative faculty. In the present study an attempt will be made to prove that this view is erroneous.

While our practical problems have to a certain degree been analyzed, architecture also comprises important 'environmental' problems which so far have by no means been adequately investigated. Therefore, I originally assigned myself the task of discussing 'the psychological background of architecture'. During this work, however, it became clear that this aspect cannot be separated from the practical side of the matter, and that architecture both as a problem and as ready solutions, must be considered as a whole, of which the individual parts are mutually interdependent. The present study has therefore developed into an attempt to present an ordered survey of all the 'dimensions' which may be imagined to enter a work . . .

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