The Genesis and Evolution of Time: A Critique of Interpretation in Physics

The Genesis and Evolution of Time: A Critique of Interpretation in Physics

The Genesis and Evolution of Time: A Critique of Interpretation in Physics

The Genesis and Evolution of Time: A Critique of Interpretation in Physics

Excerpt

Let us assume that time is a symptom or correlate of the structural and functional complexity of matter. It is a generally accepted hypothesis of modern science that the dynamics of the universe is one of inorganic and organic evolution. It would follow that time itself has evolved with the increasing complexification of natural systems.

It is easy to demonstrate that the concept of time has undergone many historical changes, but this is not the claim. The proposition is that time had its genesis in the early universe, has been evolving, and remains developmentally open-ended.

The notion of time as having a natural history is difficult to assimilate within received teachings or even to express in noncontradictory statements. Yet the detailed inquiry carried out in this monograph reveals that the evolutionary character of time is already implicit in the ways time enters physical science in particular and natural science in general.

The interpretative proposition made and examined in this book is called the principle of temporal levels. It maintains that each stable integrative level of the universe manifests a distinct temporality and that these temporalities coexist in a hierarchically nested, dynamic unity.

The principle of temporal levels offers substantial economy of thought for dealing with time in special relativity theory, quantum theory, thermodynamics, general relativity theory, and the thermodynamics of biogenesis. It elucidates a number of empirical and theoretical issues for which, thus far, only ad hoc explanations have been available, while also revealing an unsuspected unity among the major theorems of physics. Furthermore, it permits the tracing of a continuous path connecting the time-related findings of physics, biology, psychology, and sociology. A coherent unity of the different domains of modern science is thus suggested, without . . .

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