The Culture of Security in San Carlos: A Study of a Guatemalan Community of Indians and Ladinos

The Culture of Security in San Carlos: A Study of a Guatemalan Community of Indians and Ladinos

The Culture of Security in San Carlos: A Study of a Guatemalan Community of Indians and Ladinos

The Culture of Security in San Carlos: A Study of a Guatemalan Community of Indians and Ladinos

Excerpt

My studies in Guatemala, of which the present account of San Carlos forms only a part, place me under an obligation of gratitude to several persons and institutions.

I spent three field seasons in the community here called San Carlos, respectively, in the summers of 1942, 1946, 1948. Doctors Robert Redfield and Sol Tax offered very helpful advice from their extensive experience in Guatemala, Mexico, and Yucatan. The Carnegie Institution of Washington made me a temporary Research Associate during my trips to Guatemala and offered me the assistance of its Guatemala office, where I enjoyed the acquaintance and sage counsel of Robert E. Smith, Edwin M. Shook, Mary Gueroult, and others. In 1942, Duke University and The Penrose Fund of The American Philosophical Society jointly provided the funds for the work. In 1946, Duke University again contributed to the enterprise, the funds for which were supplemented by a grant from the Social Science Research Council. And in 1948, financing was furnished by the Penrose Fund of the American Philosophical Society again and the Viking Fund of New York, Inc. To all of these institutions I am very grateful. I also appreciate Dr. A. V. Kidder's benevolent attitude toward this work in his role as head of Carnegie activities in Guatemala.

In 1942, after having been in the field alone for some six weeks, I was glad to welcome as collaborator Mr. Melvin Tumin, who was at that time a graduate student in sociology at Northwestern University and who was taking his first venture into Latin American field work as a pre-doctoral fellow of the Social Science Research Council. We worked together several weeks, after which Mr. Tumin remained for a total of some seven months longer in the field. The fruits of his labors will be found in his forthcoming book on the sociological aspects of Ladino-Indian caste relations in a Guatemalan community, in his microfilmed notes, in a Ph. D. dissertation at Northwestern, and in a number of articles listed in the present bibliography and published in scholarly journals. Although Dr. Tumin was interested primarily in sociological problems and in the application of sociological techniques to Latin America, as he explains in his book, he was good enough to investigate and to check certain ethnological facts of interest to the anthropologist. In the present work reference is frequently made to his contributions.

Since Dr. Tumin is . . .

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