Indonesia and the Dutch

Indonesia and the Dutch

Indonesia and the Dutch

Indonesia and the Dutch

Excerpt

As the world has been compelled to know, relations between Indonesians and Dutch have steadily worsened since the end of the Second World War; some would put the beginning of the deterioration considerably earlier. The climax came in 1957, when large numbers of Netherlands nationals were expelled from Indonesia and virtually all Dutch property was seized. Finally, in 1960, President Sukarno of Indonesia decreed the severance of diplomatic relations with the Netherlands. The protection of Dutch nationals and interests in Indonesia was then assumed by the United Kingdom, but in March of the following year Indonesia requested that this should cease. Thus Indonesia and the Netherlands have now no diplomatic channels whatever open between them.

It is the object of this book to account for the Indonesian attitude towards the Dutch. Our first task is to survey the course of Indonesian-Dutch relations, and for that the turn of the century makes a convenient point of departure. It was then that Indonesian nationalism first stirred; whilst among those born about that time were the older generation of Indonesian nationalists who won their independence from the Netherlands in 1949.

Until the achievement of Indonesian independence there were three important social groups whose interactions affected the Netherlands Indies (as Indonesia was then called). First, in order of power, there were the Dutch at home represented by the Netherlands Government at The Hague. Second, there was the local Dutch community, which increasingly came to be represented by the Netherlands Indies Government at Batavia (now called Djakarta). Third, there were the Indonesians, who were governed by . . .

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