Major Speeches and Debates of Senator Joe McCarthy Delivered in the United States Senate, 1950-1951

Major Speeches and Debates of Senator Joe McCarthy Delivered in the United States Senate, 1950-1951

Major Speeches and Debates of Senator Joe McCarthy Delivered in the United States Senate, 1950-1951

Major Speeches and Debates of Senator Joe McCarthy Delivered in the United States Senate, 1950-1951

Excerpt

Insertion in Congressional Record of June 24, 1952, by Congressman Timothy P. Sheehan, of an Article Entitled "Senator McCarthy," by Kenneth Colegrove, Professor of Political Science, Northwestern University

Mr. Sheehan. Mr. Speaker, as a graduate of Northwestern University. I have noted with great interest that Kenneth Colegrove, professor of political science at Northwestern, has completed a study on Senator JOSEPH McCARTHY, of Wisconsin.

Professor Colegrove's reputation as a man and as a scholar is above reproach, and his many years of study in the art of political science have earned for him an enviable position in that field. The thoughts he has put forth in his study of Senator McCARTHY are, therefore, the considered views of a seasoned political scientist.

In writing this article for Freedom Clubs, which organization believes that the issues of the day are too important to resolve at the level of name calling, especially the art of character assassination as it is being widely practiced today, Professor Colegrove has attempted a scholarly and competent investigation of what has been one of the most vicious smear campaigns of our times. The most spectacular example of the use of this device to avoid facing the real issues is to be found in the personal attacks upon Senator JOSEPH McCARTHY, of Wisconsin. Professor Colegrove evaluates Senator McCARTHY's speeches in the United States Senate and attempts to appraise in an objective way the issue of "McCarthyism."

Professor Colegrove's analysis of the charges of "McCarthyism" is as follows:

SENATOR McCARTHY

Twenty-three hundred years ago, an eloquent Athenian citizen gave voice to a series of devastating orations against Philip of Macedon. It is doubtful whether Demosthenes could have documented all the charges uttered in his celebrated Philippics. His indictment of King Philip advanced far beyond the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.