Hawaii and Its Race Problem

Hawaii and Its Race Problem

Hawaii and Its Race Problem

Hawaii and Its Race Problem

Excerpt

Hawaii is a part of the United States so distant from the bulk of the Nation and so seldom visited by an appreciable number of its citizens that it is but natural that the facts with relation to what is going on within its tropical, ocean- washed borders should not be very well understood.

In the autumn of 1931 an incident occurred in Honolulu such as to claim much newspaper space throughout the Nation. A situation was developed which led newspapers, reacting as a result of known strife elsewhere, to conclude that a delicate race situation existed in Hawaii. The deduction was not illogical, but we who are responsible for the government of the islands suspected that the race situation there was so peculiar that it could not be measured by previous experience.

A first-hand investigation of conditions in these mid- Pacific islands where East does meet West, giving special attention to the class of Americans that are there evolving, therefore seemed advisable. William Atherton Du Puy, executive assistant to the Secretary, an experienced investigator and a quite disinterested witness, therefore, in the summer of 1932, was sent to Hawaii with instructions to observe the facts and report his findings.

The governmental establishment of the islands previously had been investigated by Assistant Attorney General Seth W. Richardson, of the Department of Justice. Mr. Du Puy should tell us of the new Americans that are resulting from the unprecedented situation that exists in the islands; how . . .

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