The Scope of Music

The Scope of Music

The Scope of Music

The Scope of Music

Excerpt

In the spring of 1923 I was invited to become 'Cramb Lecturer' in Glasgow University. The duties consisted in delivering ten lectures which dealt with some aspect of the Art of Music. As I had the honour of being the first lecturer appointed, it seemed to me wise to avoid taking any one province of music (such as Form, or History, or Appreciation) and treating it in detail, for such tasks would surely be undertaken by later lecturers. My aim was rather to point out to those interested in music how wide was the range and scope of the art, and how, far from being a mere adjunct of pleasure, it might well be an integral part of the life of intellectual men.

It is a presumptuous task for any one to attempt, and I can only plead, in condonation of my arrogance in attempting it, that I think it was a task which needed to be done, that no one has ever (so far as I know) tried to do it, and that the more unsatisfactory my own essay may prove the greater will be the spur to others to provide musicians with a more competent substitute.

I have compressed some passages of the original lectures and extended others, and have also omitted entirely a lecture on 'Programme Music' which I included at Glasgow, since its interest naturally depended mainly on its illustrations. In its place . . .

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