Critical Pedagogy: An Introduction

Critical Pedagogy: An Introduction

Critical Pedagogy: An Introduction

Critical Pedagogy: An Introduction

Synopsis

Critical pedagogy refers to the means and methods of testing and attempting to change the structures of schools that allow inequities. It is a cultural-political tool that takes seriously the notion of human differences, particularly those related to race, class, and gender. Critical pedagogy seeks to release the oppressed and unite people in a shared language of critique, struggle, and hope, to end various forms of human suffering. In this revised edition, Kanpol takes the pre- and in-service educators along some initial steps to becoming critical pedagogists. As before, university professors and public school teachers alike will learn how to address their own prophetic commitments to belief and faith in the fight against despair, institutional chaos, oppression, death of spirit, and exile.

Excerpt

Public schooling in the United States is suffering from an identity crisis. Caught amid the call for testing, privatization, and choice, the legacy of schooling as a crucial public sphere has been subordinated to the morally insensitive dictates of market forces and the ideological stridency of an alarming new cultural nativism. The allure of profit and commodification coupled with the conservative bravado of national purpose has found a hospitable place in the discourse of educational reform. One result has been the rewriting of what schools are and might become. Lost from the new discourse of educational reform is any notion of social justice and democratic community. Reduced to the language of competitiveness and individual gain, it has become difficult to relate the mission and purpose of schooling to a public discourse that addresses racism, poverty, sexism, nihilism, widespread ignorance, and cultural despair.

This extremely drastic reductionism regarding how public schooling is defined erases both the redemptive language of history as well as the productive, critical, contradictory, and democratic characteristics that speak to schools as sites of possibility, as crucial public spheres engaged in the construction of active citizens willing to struggle for a multicultural and multiracial democracy. Of course, the severity and hardness of the rhetoric and reforms that gained ascendancy during the Reagan and Bush eras did not take place without resistance from a wide variety of quarters. A number of critical educators have offered trenchant criticisms of schooling in the age of diminishing possibilities.

What is so unique about Barry Kanpol's book is that although he rec-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.