The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams: Being a Narrative of His Acts and Opinions, and of His Agency in Producing and Forwarding the American Revolution - Vol. 2

The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams: Being a Narrative of His Acts and Opinions, and of His Agency in Producing and Forwarding the American Revolution - Vol. 2

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The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams: Being a Narrative of His Acts and Opinions, and of His Agency in Producing and Forwarding the American Revolution - Vol. 2

The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams: Being a Narrative of His Acts and Opinions, and of His Agency in Producing and Forwarding the American Revolution - Vol. 2

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Extraordinary Effect of the Committee of Correspondence. -- Adams its Leader and Master Spirit. -- Alarm of the Loyalists. -- They attack it in the Press, and are encountered by Adams. -- The whole Province forms a Confederacy. -- Objects of Adams, in forming the Committee, not merely Provincial. -- An Intercolonial System his Ultimate View. -- His Origination of such a Scheme proved. -- Case of the Gaspee. -- Rhode Island Patriots apply to Adams for Advice. -- His Views of the Encroachments of Tyranny. -- The Home and Family of Adams. -- Picture of his Domestic Life. -- John Adams describes a Visit to his House.

THOUGH a few of the towns responded at once to the report sent forth by the Boston Committee, it was not until towards the close of the year that the leaven had worked sufficiently to produce all the results that had been anticipated. While the Committee was yet in its infancy, and before similar ones had been generally organized throughout the Province, the Loyalists, who now perfectly comprehended the vastness of the scheme, determined to prevent its consummation. At first, however, few of them believed that success could possibly attend an effort which was struggling into existence at a time when the Province was believed to be remarkably quiet and contented. While the report was preparing, Hutchinson wrote to Pownall: --

"The restless faction in this town have pleased themselves with the hopes of fresh disturbances from the salaries proposed for the judges of the Superior Court, and the usual first step has been taken, -- a town meeting. Hitherto they have fallen much short . . .

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