The Vision of a Contemporary University: A Case Study of Expansion and Development in American Higher Education, 1950-1975

The Vision of a Contemporary University: A Case Study of Expansion and Development in American Higher Education, 1950-1975

The Vision of a Contemporary University: A Case Study of Expansion and Development in American Higher Education, 1950-1975

The Vision of a Contemporary University: A Case Study of Expansion and Development in American Higher Education, 1950-1975

Excerpt

On September 26, 1960, the University of South Florida was born. After four years of planning, building, and recruiting, its doors opened to the first 1,997 students.

The fourth state university in Florida was something of a pioneer; Murray G. Ross declares in his volume New Universities in the Modern World, "As a completely new and separate institution, rather than a branch of one of the existing state universities, the University of South Florida thus became the first new institution of its kind to be conceived, planned, and built in the United States in the twentieth century."

Fifteen years later the youthful institution is coming of age, in some ways surpassing and in others confounding the hope of its founders. It has grown into a complex of ten colleges [ 1975 ], three regional centers, over 20,000 students, and a hundred or more buildings valued at around $100 million. As of 1975, graduate programs offer master's degrees in sixty-two fields and a doctorate in seven; medical and nursing colleges also offer graduate and professional degrees.

The progenitors of the University have brought their offspring into a remarkable adolescence through many moments of apprehension and bewilderment. For the University has developed a character rather different from their early dreams -- perhaps better, perhaps worse, but certainly different. Were these changes inherent from the beginning? Have they come from new pressures in the constituency, or from the peer pressure of other universities?

This book seeks to assess the forces, both organic and environmental, that have shaped the development of the University and to . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.