Christopher Marlowe

Christopher Marlowe

Christopher Marlowe

Christopher Marlowe

Excerpt

Since the beginning of the present century Marlowe's life and works have been as thoroughly investigated as those of any other English writer. Several significant events in which he took part, the circumstances of his death and many other facts concerning him have been unearthed from various documents of the time especially by Mr. G. C. Moore Smith, Mr. Frederick S. Boas, Mr. J. Leslie Hotson, Mr. Mark Eccles and Mr. John Bakeless. Although it is still very imperfectly known, his biography deserves to be looked upon as a typical example of the valuable results that may be obtained by research work patiently and judiciously carried out in collections of official records. Still more impressive is the number of monographs dealing with the text of his dramas, their sources, date of composition, style and authorship, as well as with Marlowe's possible share in some anonymous pre- Shakespearean plays. The findings of many scholars have been gathered by Mr. Boas in Christopher Marlowe, a Biographical and Critical Study (Oxford, 1940) and by Mr. Bakeless in his monumental The Tragical History of Christopher Marlowe (2 vol., Cambridge, U.S.A., 1942), a work which should not, however, be allowed to obscure the excellence of his shorter Christopher Marlowe, published in 1938.

My purpose has been neither to add new disclosures to the still all too meagre stock of facts about Marlowe -- a task which can hardly be undertaken by an English scholar residing on the Continent -- nor to reconsider problems of erudition connected with his works and to offer . . .

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