Industrial Relations in Sweden: Some Comparisons with American Experience

Industrial Relations in Sweden: Some Comparisons with American Experience

Industrial Relations in Sweden: Some Comparisons with American Experience

Industrial Relations in Sweden: Some Comparisons with American Experience

Excerpt

For many years Sweden has maintained an enviable record of labor market peace. With the exception of a five-months strike in the metal industry in 1945 there have been only minor conflicts between management and labor since 1933. The central federation of trade unions (known as the LO) and the major federation of industrial employers (known as the SAF) have achieved a degree of maturity in their relationships which is remarkable.

The Swedish experience in industrial relations has long interested Americans. In 1938 a Presidential Commission made a report on the subject, and two Americans have written scholarly books on The Government of Labor Relations in Sweden, and on The Swedish Collective Bargaining System -- both of them covering the experience up to about 1940.

This report is not intended to duplicate these earlier studies, nor is it intended to be a careful analysis of the Swedish experience since 1940. Instead, this report will simply record some impressions which have resulted from a rather intensive twomonths study of Swedish industrial relations during September and October, 1950. By "industrial relations" I mean not only the relationships between employers and union officials, but also the relationships between management and employees in the company or plant -- the field of "personnel administration." These . . .

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