From Main Street to the Left Bank: Students and Scholars Abroad

From Main Street to the Left Bank: Students and Scholars Abroad

From Main Street to the Left Bank: Students and Scholars Abroad

From Main Street to the Left Bank: Students and Scholars Abroad

Excerpt

This book is a report on the activities of American students and professors in Europe. It is based on the authors' observations during nine months spent on the Continent, and on their extended conversations with about four hundred persons, American and European, who are closely connected with these activities. In addition, about a hundred American students in Europe, who were not interviewed directly, provided extended written answers to questions related to their experiences abroad. Many professors and university administrators here in the United States were also consulted and various reports, catalogs, magazine and newspaper articles, and other printed sources provided additional information.

In the course of our investigations we visited most of the European centers where American students and professors can be found. We interviewed persons in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, Belgium, Denmark, Austria, Turkey, and Czechoslovakia. Our purpose was to discover what sort of activities the visiting Americans were engaged in and to evaluate, as accurately as possible, the effectiveness of these activities. What are the problems that American students and professors have to face in Europe? What effect do they have on Europeans, and how does the experience affect them? Are the human and financial resources that are devoted to international education being efficiently expended?

In providing answers to such questions we naturally made use of our own judgment and are prepared to accept the responsibility for our conclusions. In large measure, however, our work involved collecting and summarizing the opinions of others. We approached the task of interviewing with trepidation, believing that busy administrators and hard working students and professors might be annoyed by our interruptions of their activities. We also suspected that we would be considered spies . . .

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