Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy

Excerpt

In these pages some account of Hardy's life, and especially his literary life, is given, within which, as well as in the remaining chapters, a personal impression of his nature and his writings is attempted. The usual sources of information, such as Hardy's own prose and verse, including essays, articles and speeches, and Mrs. Hardy's two volumes of biography, have been kept in view. The two volumes of Dr. W. R. Rutland have been appreciatively read and referred to, and while the book was approaching its final stages Dr. Carl J. Weber's equally agreeable and instructive Hardy of Wessex came to hand. Let me say, however, that for such similarities as may be found in passages of information, or of critical surmise or conclusion, I have not been drawing upon the works of others, except when the specific acknowledgment is made. All who examine Hardy's life and work closely will inevitably often found their views on the same things, and their views will often be of a kind.

A great deal of hunting has been done in outlying places for this new study--in memoirs, critical surveys, topographies, in magazines, newspapers and printed odds and ends beginning to be of some antiquity. Old interviews and letters to the press have been sought for, with some success, though the war has made all such searches increasingly troublesome. In . . .

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