Jane Austen: Facts and Problems

Jane Austen: Facts and Problems

Jane Austen: Facts and Problems

Jane Austen: Facts and Problems

Excerpt

The scope of this little book perhaps admits a brief explanation. Though I have spent a substantial slice of my life in the company of Jane Austen, her family, her friends, and her fictions, I have had no impulse to attempt her life, or any systematic criticism of her art. Many years ago, however, I was moved to make a kind of survey that is neither the one nor the other. Its design is indicated by my title, which follows, at a respectful distance, the work of a greater scholar on a mightier theme: Sir Edmund Chambers on Shakespeare. But the encouragement of my friends failed to bring me to the point of publication, or even of necessary revision. The needed stimulus was not applied until the Council of Trinity College, Cambridge, honoured me by appointment as Clark Lecturer.

Grateful acknowledgement is due to those critics, kindly but not unexacting, who have read my manuscript or my proofs or both--Mr. R. A. Austen Leigh, Lord David Cecil, Miss Elizabeth Jenkins, Miss Mary Lascelles, Miss A. L. Tallmadge, and my wife. The Syndics of the Cambridge University Press have generously allowed the book to come from another place, where it had long been pledged.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.