Greek Sculpture: Its Spirit and Principles

Greek Sculpture: Its Spirit and Principles

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Greek Sculpture: Its Spirit and Principles

Greek Sculpture: Its Spirit and Principles

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The study of Greek sculpture was unknown one hundred and fifty years ago. Winckelmann was the first to pay attention to it, and to publish a book on the subject in 1755. The excavations in Pompeii and Herculaneum, the removal of the Parthenon sculptures to London by Lord Elgin, and above all, the regeneration of Greece and the subsequent rich finds in her soil, added zest to the continually growing interest in this new study.

In the eighteenth century people were unable to judge of ancient art properly because they possessed few originals and were obliged to look through the spectacles of a later Roman civilization.

The scientific nineteenth century probed deeper. The spade of the excavator brought long-forgotten treasures to light; scholars trained in the severe school of philology arranged and classified the material, and little or nothing was left to the art critic. The subject, on the whole, was in the hands of the scientific archæologists, who presented it in more or less exhaustive histories of Greek sculpture or Greek art. All their books follow the historic development. They are histories of ancient artists.

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