Negotiating Academic Literacies: Teaching and Learning across Languages and Cultures

Negotiating Academic Literacies: Teaching and Learning across Languages and Cultures

Negotiating Academic Literacies: Teaching and Learning across Languages and Cultures

Negotiating Academic Literacies: Teaching and Learning across Languages and Cultures

Synopsis

Negotiating Academic Literacies: Teaching and Learning Across Languages and Cultures is a cross-over volume in the literature between first and second language/literacy. This anthology of articles brings together different voices from a range of publications and fields and unites them in pursuit of an understanding of how academic ways of knowing are acquired. The editors preface the collection of readings with a conceptual framework that reconsiders the current debate about the nature of academic literacies. In this volume, the term academic literacies denotes multiple approaches to knowledge, including reading and writing critically.

College classrooms have become sites where a number of languages and cultures intersect. This is the case not only for students who are in the process of acquiring English, but for all learners who find themselves in an academic situation that exposes them to a new set of expectations. This book is a contribution to the effort to discover ways of supporting learning across languages and cultures--and to transform views about what it means to teach and learn, to read and write, and to think and know.

Unique to this volume is the inclusion of the perspectives of writers as well as those of teachers and researchers. Furthermore, the contributors reveal their own struggles and accomplishments as they themselves have attempted to negotiate academic literacies. The chronological ordering of articles provides a historical perspective, demonstrating ways in which issues related to teaching and learning across cultures have been addressed over time. The readings have consistency in terms of quality, depth, and passion; they raise important philosophical questions even as they consider practical classroom applications. The editors provide a series of questions that enable the reader to engage in a generative and exciting process of reflection and inquiry. This book is both a reference for teachers who work or plan to work with diverse learners, and a text for graduate-level courses, primarily in bilingual and ESL studies, composition studies, English education, and literacy studies.

Excerpt

In Negotiating Academic Literacies, we bring together different voices from a range of publications and fields and unite them in pursuit of an understanding of how academic ways of knowing are acquired. Such an understanding is critical, we believe, given the extent to which the growing diversity in U.S. postsecondary institutions is challenging assumptions and terms that once seemed straightforward. For example, it is no longer possible to assume that there is one type of literacy in the academy. Academic literacy, which once denoted simply the ability to read and write college-level texts, now must embrace multiple approaches to knowledge. Hence, our use of the term academic literacies. College classrooms have become sites where different languages and cultures intersect, including the various discourses of students, teachers, and researchers. In our experience, the result of this interaction, even when (perhaps because) it involves struggle and conflict, is most often intellectual growth, for these different languages and cultures build on and give shape to one another.

As teachers and researchers, we have discovered that this perspective on language and culture applies not only to students who are still in the process of acquiring English but also to learners who find themselves in an academic situation that exposes them to a new set of expectations. We view this situation as a new culture, or rather, as various cultures, for when students travel from one classroom to another, they find that each has its unique conventions, concepts, and terms. At the same time that each classroom culture brings with it a particular language and set of assumptions, like all cultures it is inevitably shaped by the interaction of students, teacher, and texts. Collectively, classroom experiences across the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.