Psychotherapy with Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Persons: A Systemic Model

Psychotherapy with Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Persons: A Systemic Model

Psychotherapy with Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Persons: A Systemic Model

Psychotherapy with Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Persons: A Systemic Model

Synopsis

This comprehensive treatise on the applications of systems theory presents a model designed to aid clinicians and counselors in understanding and treating deaf, hard-of-heading, and deafened individuals. The model uses a wide ecological perspective to examine the influences of larger networks -- families, professionals, and friends -- on the individual and vice versa. The author balances theoretical descriptions with practical intervention guidelines utilizing actual case studies and verbatim transcripts of therapy sessions.

Excerpt

Over the past several years, I have taken to jotting down clinical observations, ideas, successes, failures, and reactions on scrap pieces of paper and then stuffing them in a folder marked 'miscellaneous." Although, initially, this was an efficient method of warehousing information, the contents of that folder soon accumulated to become a disarray of scribbled notes that made no contextual sense and that had begun to overflow in the file cabinet. What began as a simple clean-up intervention to organize and synthesize the contents of the "miscellaneous file" eventually culminated with my writing this volume. This was the clerical reason for writing the book.

More officially, the goal of this book is to present a systemic model for understanding and treating deaf and hard-of-hearing persons in the context of their families and larger ecology. Its objectives are to describe and illustrate a systemic framework for (a) understanding functional and dysfunctional relationships that often occur within families and among therapists, counselors, and other professionals who may be involved with deaf or hard-of-hearing persons; and (b) formulating and implementing clinical interventions to modify dysfunctional individual, family, and larger-thanfamily dynamics.

The intended readership includes clinicians who provide psychological treatment to individuals, couples, families, and groups of this population-- not only "family therapists"; and the innumerable professionals who inevitably find themselves in counseling or "therapeutic" relationships with deaf . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.