The Zone of Indifference

The Zone of Indifference

The Zone of Indifference

The Zone of Indifference

Excerpt

If it is at all possible to reduce the historic developments of the last fifty years to one fact it is this: the close of the European Age. Europe, only a generation ago the center of world power, is now the debated ground upon which powers more powerful than any European nation contest the part Europe is to play in the world order. If American intervention in two world wars that began in Europe has one meaning it is this: to redress the balance of the Old World and thus to act out Canning's rhetoric challenge of a hundred years ago. If recent American foreign policy has held, despite vacillations and contradictions, to one purpose it is this: to raise Europe from the ruins of her former might, forge a Western alliance, and erect the political and military framework of a new and larger structure, the Western Community. It is within the broad context of this policy that we must view American relationships to Europe, to individual European states, and to the globe.

American foreign policy is determined by a choice between alternatives. The United States chose Europe as the principal target of its initiative. That choice has been made and is irreversible. The preservation of the Western Community and hence the defense of Europe have precedence over all other commitments of the United States in world politics. If it is not this decision that oriented American foreign policy then its meaning is indeed that of a child's tale told by an idiot. That the struggle for Europe is being fought out in many places along the arching rim of Eurasia, indeed upon the entire globe, does not belie the fact that its stakes are Europe.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.