The Japanese Nation: Its Land, Its People, and Its Life, with Special Consideration to Its Relations with the United States

The Japanese Nation: Its Land, Its People, and Its Life, with Special Consideration to Its Relations with the United States

Read FREE!

The Japanese Nation: Its Land, Its People, and Its Life, with Special Consideration to Its Relations with the United States

The Japanese Nation: Its Land, Its People, and Its Life, with Special Consideration to Its Relations with the United States

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The present work is the outcome of my labours as Japanese exchange professor in this country, during the academic year of 1911-12, and I take this opportunity of explaining how my work began and ended.

The idea of sending public men of note unofficially from this country to Japan and from Japan to the United States, owes its inception to Mr. Hamilton Holt of New York City. When his plan had been developed to a certain degree of feasibility, the task of carrying it into effect was accepted by President Nicholas Murray Butler of Columbia University, in whose hands the idea took the more practical if the less ambitious form of an exchange professorship, and he interested certain typical universities to join in putting it into effect. After the enterprise was fairly launched, the responsibility for its continuance was passed on to, and made a part of, the work of the Carnegie Peace Endowment. My labours commenced after the project had reached its second stage of development--namely, while the Universities concerned had the matter in their immediate charge.

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