On Disarmament: The Role of Conventional Arms Control in National Security Strategy

On Disarmament: The Role of Conventional Arms Control in National Security Strategy

On Disarmament: The Role of Conventional Arms Control in National Security Strategy

On Disarmament: The Role of Conventional Arms Control in National Security Strategy

Synopsis

This War College text incorporates the work of practitioners, academics, and members of the U.S. negotiating team to present a concise analysis of arms reduction efforts. Its first five chapters provide a thorough understanding of conventional arms control history. Successive chapters address: the role of partial disarmament; CFE proposals, data, and military implications of a successful agreement; U.S. Interagency Group process; High Level Task Force; and updates on both Vienna negotiations. This hard-headed book designed for policy makers is a valuable resource for courses in foreign policy, negotiation, political theory, and public policy.

Excerpt

Events of the past year in Europe--the "Revolution of 1989"--place regional arms control initiatives into a new context. Conventional arms control negotiations began early in the year, involving nato and Warsaw Treaty Organization members in more or less traditional roles. the year ended with the virtual paralysis of the Warsaw Pact and serious discussion concerning the reunification of Germany. This timely compendium of contemporary thought attempts to put the crucial issues of European arms-reduction efforts into focus.

To the serious student of foreign policy and international relations, as well as to policymakers and military strategists, conventional arms control has become a puzzle on the paths of both future nato policies and Soviet-U.S. relations. Where do we begin our research? What are the objectives and how were they derived? What issues are involved? Who are the relevant participants? Where do different nations stand on the issues? What do the current proposals constitute? How close are we to an agreement? Can conventional reductions be verified? What does the post arms-reduction world look like? What is the future of the alliances in Europe? Will we have to change national security strategy? Is arms control still relevant, considering the political changes in Eastern Europe? How can we agree on answers before events change them? the authors of this text provide the answers to those questions plus much more.

To begin to comprehend the conundrum of conventional arms control, the authors start with the earliest events in a process of multilateral arms control negotiations that span more than 17 years. By opening their book with a chronology of conventional arms control events from NATO's Harmel Report in 1967 through the Doctrinal Seminar in 1990, the authors provide a "quick study" for the reader in Chapter 1. This chapter presents a short overview of the activities, conferences, meetings, major speeches, and political initiatives (which have occurred in the past) that continue to influence multilateral negotiations today. the authors briefly . . .

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