Poe: A Critical Study

Poe: A Critical Study

Poe: A Critical Study

Poe: A Critical Study

Excerpt

In this essay I have undertaken what may be frankly admitted a philosophic inquiry into the mind and writings of Edgar Allan Poe. I know that professional philosophers (if they should ever peer into this book) would be shocked to discover what can happen when the categories of philosophical analysis are somehow displayed as literature; and I am quite certain that all of their objections would be valid. But when one deals with philosophy in literature, he does so in a full awareness that he is not considering "philosophy" as the philosophers have laid out their programs of thought; he is considering those concepts which somehow move from the abstractions of logic and epistemology into the murky deliquescence of literary ideas as those ideas are known and stated by literary artists in a period of literary history. Edgar Poe was a writer with a certain philosophic bent: his career, quite unplanned by Poe himself, was directed toward an understanding of certain principles of art, principles likewise of the mind and method of the artist, and even theories of the autonomous nature of art itself. From his very early poem "Tamerlane" to his last major expression in Eureka, Poe tried in his way to be a philosophic writer: he moved toward what, in terms of literary . . .

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