Translating Slavery: Gender and Race in French Women's Writing, 1783-1823

Translating Slavery: Gender and Race in French Women's Writing, 1783-1823

Translating Slavery: Gender and Race in French Women's Writing, 1783-1823

Translating Slavery: Gender and Race in French Women's Writing, 1783-1823

Synopsis

This study explores the complex interrelationships that exist between translation, gender and race. It focuses on anti-slavery writing by French women during the revolutionary period, when a number of them spoke out against the oppression of slaves and women."

Excerpt

Albrecht Neubert and Gregory M. Shreve

The monograph series Translation Studies is the successor of the German language series Übersetzungswissenschaftliche Beiträge, published since 1978 in Leipzig, Germany. For twelve years the Beiträge was the voice of an approach to translation studies known as the "Leipzig School." In the pages of the series, Otto Kade, Gert Jäger, Albrecht Neubert, Heide Schmidt, and others explored the various possibilities of a translation studies that integrated linguistics, pragmatics, sociolinguistics, text linguistics, and the traditional concerns of philology in a new and dynamic discipline. Now with a new publisher and a broader scope, Translation Studies continues the tradition of the Beiträge. Transcending the primarily linguistic orientation of the original series, its purpose is to explore the boundaries of translation scholarship and to present in the scope of a single monograph series the breadth of scholarly concern with translation.

The first volume of the series, Translation as Text, interprets translation studies as an empirical discipline, based in the study of translation practice and viewing the translation process as a valid object of scientific study. This conception of translation evolved from a German milieu. Like the broad German approach to translation of which it is a part (Übersetzungswissenschaft), this text-based translation science goes beyond linguistics proper. It emphasizes the systemic and objective character of translation, not just as a recoding of sign sequences, but as a recreation of worlds of discourse. Further, this form of translation studies is part of a historical attempt to lay the disciplinary foundations for university-level training in language mediation in a multilingual Europe and world.

The processes and results of translation are described in terms of an empirical approach to the concept of "text." Translation reality is seen as "text-induced text production," capable of description and, by . . .

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