Letters of Susan Hale

Letters of Susan Hale

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Letters of Susan Hale

Letters of Susan Hale

Read FREE!

Excerpt

One can rarely give in a few words any true impression of a long life. Susan Hale was almost seventy-seven when she died, and most of those now living remember her as she was in the latter half of her life, -- the mistress of Matunuck in the summer, the unwearied traveller in the winter. But before she had settled into the life most characteristic of her later years, she was a very different as well as a very individual and brilliant personality. As a girl in the family circle at Brookline, and later as a woman in the Boston society of the seventies, she was a very distinct character. The following lines can give only a little concerning her life in those and later years which will enable people to read with some comprehension the letters now published.

Yet certain things were permanent with her. As she grew older, her most striking characteristic was probably a very great sympathy, which enabled her to make many intimate friends. Particularly was this the case with young people, who used to feel about her much as though she were one of themselves, called her Susan, and talked to her on their own current interests without often realising that she really belonged to an earlier generation. In that generation, however, her chief quality had been something quite different, chiefly a certain gift of brilliant cleverness in thought and expression which made her a noteworthy person among her contemporaries.

If one called her a "woman of the world" -- in the broadest and best sense -- one might include both . . .

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