The Korea Story

The Korea Story

The Korea Story

The Korea Story

Excerpt

For many months generals and lesser officers, noncoms, and privates have been returning to the United States to teach our troops in training the lessons to be learned from the war in Korea. These have been valuable lessons, learned at a frightful cost in blood and suffering. Old concepts of warfare and training and supposedly good weapons have been scrapped. In Korea our men have learned again to fight a guerilla warfare; they have learned that to defeat communism in battle it is often necessary to fight in the hills and mountains where jeeps and tanks cannot venture.

The story of the war and of the military lessons we have learned has been told many times over. But there is another part of our Korea story that has not been told, and there are other lessons that have not yet been learned. It is this other part that I have attempted to tell. It is the story of events prior to that fateful Sunday in June when the communist armies stormed across the 38th Parallel. It is the story of our occupation of South Korea, our sponsorship of the first elections in a nation's history, and the work of the American Mission in Korea, the largest diplomatic establishment ever to be maintained overseas by our Department of State. It is a story of great opportunities not seized upon, of mistakes made and not corrected. The Korea story is in many respects an aftermath of our tragic mistakes in China.

It is not always possible to tell this story in chronological sequence. Events and personalities of one period must be related to our activities in other periods; mistakes made in Seoul, Chunchon, or Kaesong must be traced back to other mistakes made in Washington or Nanking. To tell the story . . .

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