Memoirs of Two Young Married Women

Memoirs of Two Young Married Women

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Memoirs of Two Young Married Women

Memoirs of Two Young Married Women

Read FREE!

Excerpt

LOUISE DE CHAULIEU TO RENÉE DE MAUCOMBE.

PARIS, September.

MY DEAR DARLING, -- I am out of school, too I and as you did not write me at Blois, it is for me to begin our charming correspondence. But there is nothing in this letter to make your beautiful black eyes sparkle; keep your exclamations for the one in which I shall confide to you my first love. People always talk of a first love; can there be a second? "Hush!" I hear you say; "instead of that, tell me how it is you have left the convent, where, when we parted, you expected to profess."

My dear, though the miracle of my deliverance did happen at the Carmelites, it was really the most natural thing in the world. The qualms of a frightened conscience carried the day over the commands of inflexible family policy, that's all. My aunt, who did not wish to see me die of consumption, conquered my mother, who had so long prescribed the novitiate as the only cure for that malady. The black melancholy which took possession of me after you left the convent hastened this happy escape.

So, here I am in Paris, my angel; and I owe to you the happiness of being here. My Renée, if you could but have seen me the first day I had to live without you, you would certainly feel proud to have inspired such deep sentiments in your friend's heart. We have so long dreamed together, we have spread our wings and imagined life so often, that our souls seem welded together, like those of the Hungarian sisters; you remember that story told us by Monsieur Beauvisage? -- who certainly was not the man of his name! Was ever a convent doctor better chosen?

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