Nineteen Thirty-One Political Crisis

Nineteen Thirty-One Political Crisis

Nineteen Thirty-One Political Crisis

Nineteen Thirty-One Political Crisis

Excerpt

On Monday, August 24, 1931, H.M. King George V accepted the resignation of the Labour Ministry which had been in office since June of 1929. The outgoing Prime Minister (J. Ramsay MacDonald) then accepted the King's commission to form a National Government on a comprehensive basis for the purpose of dealing with the existing financial emergency. By the evening of Tuesday, August 25, the new Cabinet had been formed. It included the Leader of the Conservative Party (Stanley Baldwin) and the acting Leader of the Liberal Party (Sir Herbert -- now Viscount -- Samuel). By then the three directing executives of the Labour Movement had announced their decision to enter into vigorous opposition, a decision endorsed by the Parliamentary Labour Party on August 28. The Conservative and Liberal Parties on the same day agreed to support the new Government. On October 7 -- much had happened in the interim -- Parliament was dissolved. At the ensuing General Election on October 27, the National Government secured an overwhelming majority in the House of Commons. MacDonald then reconstructed his Ministry. His second National Government terminated in June of 1935.

The political crisis of 1931, which resulted in the formation of the National Government and its subsequent electoral triumph, has probably had an influence upon the course of British politics greater even than that of 1846, with which it has sometimes been compared. In the outcome, undesigned and unexpected, it brought to an end a period of political uncertainty and governmental instability which had characterized the previous decade. It led to a clarification of the political situation by promoting an alignment into two main parties. The disintegration and decline of the Liberal Party was accelerated; the Conservative Party was enabled to broaden its basis and transform its policy; while, for the Labour Party, the crisis marked the end of one vitally important stage on the path to power, and provided the opportunity for a . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.