Black Politics and Black Political Behavior

Black Politics and Black Political Behavior

Black Politics and Black Political Behavior

Black Politics and Black Political Behavior

Synopsis

This pioneering volume advances the thesis that there exists a significant linkage between Black politics and Black political behavior, heretofore treated as separate and distinct areas of study. This is the first work to bring the two together and to support such an approach with empirical studies. Chapter authors explore and analyze basic and fundamental areas of linkage providing a provocative and insightful contribution to the literature of Black politics and political behavior in America. Organized into five main linkage blocks, the work examines: Theoretical linkages between Black politics and Black political behavior; national linkages; state-contextual linkages; procedural linkages; and gender linkages. This volume will be of interest to scholars and students in American politics and political behavior and African-American politics and political behavior.

Excerpt

Kenneth A. Jordan and Modibo M. Kadalie

A considerable number of the black intelligentsia, including political scientists, political pundits, and other informed observers, agree that much of the social, economic, and political progress experienced by African Americans since the Brown v. Board of Education decision in 1954; the Civil Rights Acts of 1964, 1966, and 1968; and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 has been largely negated as a result of the Reagan administration's all-out assault on equal opportunity, civil rights, and affirmative action policies. Others concede that the frontal assault of the Reagan administration on social policies and civil rights is unlike that of any president since Herbert Hoover in 1928. The civil rights records of both Reagan and Bush during the past decade have been dismal and counterproductive. The clock of racial equality has been turned back as they both have consistently opposed affirmative action in theory as well as practice.

The attempt by African Americans in the American political system to impact public policy has been incremental and piecemeal. The social, economic, and political gains accomplished by black America during the past century are indisputably linked to the political activities of black Americans, including such practices as citizens participation in the governmental process through voting, selecting public officials, and holding public office and through the politics of mass protest, which has augmented governmental respect for personal liberties, civil and human rights, and the rights of citizens to equitable justice by due process of law. In spite of the significant progress that African Americans have made through participation in the nation's electoral institutions, the politics of African Americans--in their quest for basic citizenship rights, including equal treatment in the courts, the right to vote and hold public office, and equal treatment when seeking education and employment--

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