Radical Reform in Yeltsin's Russia: Political, Economic, and Social Dimemsions

Radical Reform in Yeltsin's Russia: Political, Economic, and Social Dimemsions

Radical Reform in Yeltsin's Russia: Political, Economic, and Social Dimemsions

Radical Reform in Yeltsin's Russia: Political, Economic, and Social Dimemsions

Synopsis

This work examines the political and organizational factors that have shaped Russian economic reforms since the demise of the Soviet Union. The author draws on a variety of sources - including interviews conducted in Ekaterinburg, Voronezh and Smolensk - to present a multilayered portrait of the successes, failures and umintended consequences of the reforms. The book covers: the consequence of dissolving the USSR and Russia's role in the CIS; political transition; economic reform; assessment of the political and social implications of neo-liberal moneterism and of the voucher privatisation programme; and both regional and federal structures and processes.

Excerpt

This study examines political, institutional, and organizational factors that shaped Russian economic reforms from late 1991 until mid-1994, and further inquires into the implications of the reforms for both economic and noneconomic institutions in Russia. This work continues the stream of research on which our earlier volume, Property to the People (1994), was based. That book title was inspired by Boris Yeltsin's proclamation, as voucher privatization was about to begin, that Russia needed "millions of owners" rather than "a few millionaires." The interviews for that study (which numbered more than 5,700) were conducted in mid-1992. Our positive initial judgment about the direction of Russia's reforms is reflected in the title of that book. But our findings forced us to modify our point of view, if not the work's title, during the course of the project.

Our research for this book included interview data that were collected in mid-1993 in Moscow, Ekaterinburg, Voronezh, and Smolensk, as well as primary and secondary material from a variety of sources. The 5,019 respondents included political and opinion leaders at the federal and local levels, directors and other administrators of privatized and privatizing enterprises, privatization administrators, and general population subsamples in each of the four cities. (Details are provided in Appendix A.) At various points in the book we also introduce interview data collected during 1992.

Our earlier work had made us skeptical about the course the reformers had set. In this continuation project, however, we pointedly attempted to search as widely as possible for critical data related to the study's themes--whatever conclusions those data might support--and . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.