Reading in General Education: An Exploratory Study; a Report of the Committee on Reading in General Education

Reading in General Education: An Exploratory Study; a Report of the Committee on Reading in General Education

Reading in General Education: An Exploratory Study; a Report of the Committee on Reading in General Education

Reading in General Education: An Exploratory Study; a Report of the Committee on Reading in General Education

Excerpt

The chief purpose of the Committee on Reading in General Education, as defined in the request for its appointment, was to make an intensive, critical study of the present status, recent trends, and current issues in reading, with special reference to high schools and junior colleges, and to identify problems that are in urgent need of further investigation. At an early meeting of the committee, plans were made for the preparation of a report of findings which might serve as a source of information to research agencies, curriculum specialists, and to school officers and teachers. The project was recognized as a possible means of stimulating broader interest throughout the country in reading problems and vigorous effort to increase the reading efficiency of high school and college students.

In defining the scope of the survey the committee gave careful consideration to each of three definitions of reading which differ widely in respect to the life situations to which the term applies. One of these definitions limits reading to the interpretation of written and printed symbols; a second assumes that reading includes the interpretation of all symbols or signs which denote or represent or stand for something else; a third conceives reading as the process of making intelligent adjustments to stimuli from various sources, including natural signs as well as conventional symbols. The committee recognizes that each of these definitions has merit. It believes that general education is vitally concerned with the various types of interpretation that individuals should make in contemporary life. It also recognizes the need for intensive studies of all forms of interpretation involved in normal living. In preparing this report, however, attention was directed primarily to the interpretation of written and printed symbols. The adoption of this plan was influenced by several considerations, namely, the expanding role which the reading of printed matter has assumed recently in . . .

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