Naught for Your Comfort

Naught for Your Comfort

Naught for Your Comfort

Naught for Your Comfort

Excerpt

This book has been written in the odd hours of an exceedingly busy year. Perhaps that fact alone may give it value, for it has certainly come red hot out of the crucible which is South Africa today.

Many books about the Union of South Africa have appeared of recent months, and many more yet to come, for it is a country of inexhaustible fascination and interest. This book can claim only to throw light upon one small corner of the country, and it springs from a personal experience which is limited and confessedly partial.

Yet I have been a South African citizen: and I freely chose my citizenship. I wished to live and die a South African citizen, though I would have preferred with Alan Paton, to be called a citizen of Africa: an African, in fact. I am also a Religious, that is to say, a member of a monastic Community of the Anglican Church. In our Rule we are bidden "to have all things common" and not to use the pronouns "I" and "Mine." I must ask the Community's forgiveness for doing so in this book. But I have done so for two reasons: first, for the obvious one of literary style; secondly, because the opinions expressed here are entirely my own responsibility. They do not in any way reflect the common mind of the Community, though I believe many of my brethren are in substantial agreement with them. Yet without the love and support of the Community I should . . .

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