Colombia and the United States, 1765-1934

Colombia and the United States, 1765-1934

Colombia and the United States, 1765-1934

Colombia and the United States, 1765-1934

Excerpt

During the era following the World War, Colombia achieved marked stability and assumed a leading röle in Inter-American affairs. After having had in the last century at least ten general revolutions, seventy local uprisings, seven national constitutions, and some fifty presidents and acting-presidents, the nation seems now to have arrived politically. The orderly presidential elections of 1930 and 1934 indicate the end of political apprenticeship and the vindication of the belief of the founders of the republic that Colombians are capable of self-government.

Strategically, Colombia is of great importance to the United States. It faces both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, it long possessed the Isthmus of Panama, and it still possesses territory very near both termini of the canal. The distance from its northern coast to New Orleans is only 1,400 miles, and to New York only 1,900 miles.

With a population of 8,573,126 and a domain of approximately 476,916 square miles, Colombia is now ranked by some as third in population and area among the South American states. It is nearly twice the size of the state of Texas, over nine times that of North Carolina, and more than seven times that of all New England. It is larger than the combined areas of Great Britain, France, Belgium, and Italy.

In recent years Colombia's foreign trade has enjoyed a phenomenal growth. Exports to the United States alone in 1923 were greater than the entire national trade of 1913. The total volume of some $50,000,000 of the latter year reached $273,688,701 in 1928. Of this amount, some eighty per cent of the exports went to and some . . .

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