The Peaceable Americans of 1860-1861: A Study in Public Opinion

The Peaceable Americans of 1860-1861: A Study in Public Opinion

Read FREE!

The Peaceable Americans of 1860-1861: A Study in Public Opinion

The Peaceable Americans of 1860-1861: A Study in Public Opinion

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The title and contents of this monograph have undergone an evolutionary process. In its most rudimentary form, the title was The Reconstruction Period in Kentucky. When it was ascertained that the reconstruction ardently desired by the Kentuckians was a peaceful, pre-war affair, the title immediately underwent transformation in order to make a distinction between pre-war and post-war reconstruction. In its final form it deals with the pre-war period.

That the Kentuckians of 1861 were the most Constitution-abiding and peaceable of all Americans was not necessarily the result of preeminent ability in the science of government but was chiefly due to their geographical location. They were situated in the center of the nation and were therefore equipped with a better understanding of the governmental problem confronting the nation than would have been possible had they inhabited a region less in touch with the current of opinion in all sections.

Kentucky's decision in 1861 was that neither secession on the part of the South, nor coercion on the part of the North, was a justifiable solution for the governmental problem of the time. The Kentuckians felt that the conditions existing in 1861 did not warrant such extreme measures but did warrant the assembling of a National Convention such as that which met the great crisis at the other critical period in the nation's life with success. They felt that the brain of the American people was capable of adjusting the existing difficulties and therefore strenuously . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.