Relativity: A Richer Truth

Relativity: A Richer Truth

Relativity: A Richer Truth

Relativity: A Richer Truth

Excerpt

When in 1940 France and all of western continental Europe collapsed under the weight of German power, there were people everywhere who thought this breakdown of military and political morale had its deeper roots in agnostic and skeptical attitudes--a disbelief in absolute values. This "relativism," a common form of thought in Western Europe, was frequently regarded as an effect of the allegedly exaggerated role science has played in modern thinking. This general feeling was largely responsible for the convocation in the fall of 1940, in New York City, of the Conference on Science, Philosophy and Religion, a conference which, since then, has continued to meet annually. The precise aim of this Conference was to establish a common understanding of democratic principles that would help to overcome the high pressure propaganda of totalitarian values. The members were anxious to prove that the danger of "relativism," which was, in a certain way, a frequent concomitant of liberalism and democracy, could be avoided by democratic methods.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.