Rebel Saints

Rebel Saints

Rebel Saints

Rebel Saints

Excerpt

It is the aim of Rebel Saints to tell the story of Quakerism in the light of romantic adventure. It was the peculiar fanaticism of the Quakers, that the pressure of existing wrongs pushed them into immediate resistance. Characterized by profound spiritual experiences, the early Quakers verified the Christian doctrine that all things are possible to him who believes, and illustrated it by incredible adventures. It is the nature of men to content themselves with mulling over the wrongs of the world; under the dynamic leadership of George Fox, it was the practice of the Quakers to react immediately to belief "so as to be ready to be its martyr." That a wrong had gone on forever was to them proof that it had gone on long enough. The world can be changed when the spirit of man wills it.

Their relation to the political state was anarchistic; their anarchy was successful inasmuch as they proposed to substitute a higher law for that against which they rebelled; and to this higher law they submitted themselves with a phenomenal self-discipline. They refused to walk the beaten track when they had discovered a better way, and, unlike the ordinary revolutionist who blindly beats out against the system that oppresses him . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.