The Theory of Logic: An Introductory Text

The Theory of Logic: An Introductory Text

The Theory of Logic: An Introductory Text

The Theory of Logic: An Introductory Text

Excerpt

This book is an introductory text in the sense that a beginner, who is capable of concentration, should be able to understand it; and also in the sense that, when thoroughly understood, it gives sufficient preparation for the study of such an advanced treatise as the Principia Mathematica. Nevertheless, one must not expect to find it an easy and simple popularization of the basic ideas of the Principia. In order to grasp the significance of formal logic, the student is required to make an effort at abstraction. This requirement dictates the condensation of the exposition, for lengthy explanations and discussions would, paradoxically, make the study more difficult by prolonging excessively this sustained effort at abstraction. Of course, a condensed exposition has its own difficulties, but this merely means that an understanding of the foundations of logic cannot be made altogether easy. Furthermore, this book cannot be regarded altogether as an introduction to more technical writings because of its claim to an original treatment of many issues of logic. Since in the text itself technicalities must be avoided, in this Preface I should like to point to at least some of the contributions of the book and to sketch briefly the reasons for them, especially for those which are controversial.

It is usually said that there are only two ways for a . . .

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