The Story of the Springfield Plan

The Story of the Springfield Plan

The Story of the Springfield Plan

The Story of the Springfield Plan

Excerpt

The Constitution of the United States sets forth certain fundamental principles which guarantee to every American the right to freedom of religion, of speech, and of the press, the right of assembly, and the right to trial by jury. The Constitution was adopted "to establish justice . . . promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty . . ." for all.

As teachers we are entrusted with the duty of helping to maintain and improve our democracy. In the conduct of our work we must, therefore, exemplify the principles for which American democracy stands.

The vast majority of teachers and other citizens accept these principles of the Constitution and strive to practice them. The schools of Springfield have done no more than this, and in doing this, they have fortunately enjoyed the co-operation of the whole community. The parents and the civic groups of Springfield--the churches, newspapers, radio, business men, labor groups, and other social agencies-- have worked with the teachers to develop effective methods of education for democratic citizenship.

This work is constantly being improved, expanded, and enriched on the basis of day-to-day experience. It is neither a rigid plan nor an authoritative guide. It is a flexible program designed to meet the problems of one community. In developings its program Springfield made liberal use of the traditions and democratic practices accepted in other communi-

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