German Tragedy in the Age of Enlightenment: A Study in the Development of Original Tragedies, 1724-1768

German Tragedy in the Age of Enlightenment: A Study in the Development of Original Tragedies, 1724-1768

German Tragedy in the Age of Enlightenment: A Study in the Development of Original Tragedies, 1724-1768

German Tragedy in the Age of Enlightenment: A Study in the Development of Original Tragedies, 1724-1768

Excerpt

For the sake of reading facility, I have translated all quotations used in the main text of this book from German into English; but should the reader wish to consult the German text, it may be obtained on microfilm from the Library at the University of California, Los Angeles. It is hoped that this arrangement will be welcomed even by readers perfectly conversant with German, for they too might well prefer a uniform text (either all in German or all in English) to one which would otherwise resent a somewhat macaronic appearance. Titles, however, as well as quotations in the footnotes, have been left in their original form.

The decision to make translations formed a logical part of my effort and desire to write about a recondite scholarly subject in a manner that would render it both less formidable for the non- specialist and more agreeable for the specialist, without, to be sure, the sacrifice of depth or thoroughness. In this endeavor, as in many other matters, I owe my inspiration ultimately to my former professor, the late Dr. Fred O. Nolte of Washington University, St. Louis, who for many years was my friend and counsellor. It was he who first awakened and then nourished my interest in the eighteenth century, and who early taught me the importance of looking for the significant, though sometimes little, facts and details behind the broad generalities current in literary history. If a trace of the gracious, urbane spirit and healthy humane judgment that fill his own books is detectable in the pages of this one, then that would be its best ornament.

Furthermore, I am greatly indebted to my colleague at the University of California, Los Angeles, Dr. Victor A. Oswald, Jr., for his effective encouragement of my work from its inception to its conclusion, and for his invaluable, ungrudging service in reading manuscript and returning manifold constructive criticisms and suggestions. Warm thanks go also to my colleague Dr. Eli Sobel for his constant interest and assistance in the project, and to my colleague Dr. Carl W. Hagge for his willingness to confer at any time about . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.