Autobiography, with Letters

Autobiography, with Letters

Autobiography, with Letters

Autobiography, with Letters

Excerpt

In looking back, I should have to change somewhat the famous words of Landor:

I strove with none, for none was worth my strife.
Nature I loved, and next to Nature Art:
I warmed both hands before the fire of life:
It sinks, and I am ready to depart.

Very fine, no doubt; although, written by Landor, the first four words have an oddity all their own. To fit my own case, I should have to say

I strove with none. I always hated strife.
Nature I loved, and God and Man and Art:
I warmed both hands before the fire of life:
It sinks, yet I'm not ready to depart.

The vast majority of persons are compelled to live without prodigious adventures and without the gratification of most of their transient desires; yet ordinary circumscribed existence can be exciting.

For although I have lived what is called a sheltered life, it has been anything but dull. Daily existence has often been thrilling. Apparently I have been and am much happier than most men and women. My happiness certainly has never come from resignation. It has been said that the happiest men and women in the world are those who have good health, a sufficient income, and no ambition. This would probably be true if we meant by happiness a quiet enjoyment of existence with the absence of worry or unsatisfied desire. I do not know whether I envy such . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.