Parents, Children and Communication: Frontiers of Theory and Research

Parents, Children and Communication: Frontiers of Theory and Research

Parents, Children and Communication: Frontiers of Theory and Research

Parents, Children and Communication: Frontiers of Theory and Research

Synopsis

This is the first edited volume in the communication field to examine parent-child interaction. It creates a framework for future research in this growing area -- family communication, and more specifically, parent-child communication -- and also suggests new areas of communication research among parents and children -- cultural, work-related, taboo topics, family sex discussions, conflict, and abuse. Chapter authors provide thorough coverage of theoretical approaches, new methods, and emerging contexts including lesbian/gay parent-child relationships. In so doing, they bring a communication perspective to enduring problems of discipline, adolescent conflict, and physical child abuse. The text highlights various methodological approaches -- both quantitative and qualitative -- including conversation analysis, grounded theory, participant-observation, and phenomenological interviewing of children. It also introduces and surveys various theoretical approaches -- general systems, developmental, cultural, and intergenerational transmission.

Excerpt

Less than 20 years ago, Bochner staked out a "new conceptual frontier" in the field of communication: family systems. Bochner (1976) equipped communication researchers with an annotated primer of psychological, sociological, and therapeutic readings about families, and pointed out various paths that might be taken.

Since Bochner's lead, communication scholars who chose to pioneer the family are thriving. There has been a considerable increase in family communication research (Stephen, 1990) as well as state-of-the-art reviews in communication handbooks (e.g., Bochner & Eisenberg, 1987; Fitzpatrick & Badzinski, 1985, 1995) and journals (e.g., Vangelisti, 1993). Family communication scholars have organized and established the Commission on Family Communication of the Speech Communication Association. The commission currently numbers more than 200 members. Family communication courses are becoming commonplace in university curricula. And, family communication textbooks, written by a growing number of communication scholars (e.g., Arliss, 1993; Beebe & Masterson, 1986; Galvin & Brommel, 1991; Pearson, 1993; Yerby, Buerkel-Rothfuss, & Bochner, 1989) feature more communication studies and rely less on the research of allied fields.

For example, many pioneers, spurred by soaring divorce rates, devoted their time and resources to the exploration of marital communication. Fitzpatrick (1988), Sillars (Sillars, Pike, T. Jones, & Murphy, 1984; Sillars, Weisberg , Yost, & Zeitlow, 1987), and Krueger (1982, 1985), among others, undertook the important work of mapping out the theoretical terrain of marital . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.