Principled Diplomacy: Security and Rights in U.S. Foreign Policy

Principled Diplomacy: Security and Rights in U.S. Foreign Policy

Principled Diplomacy: Security and Rights in U.S. Foreign Policy

Principled Diplomacy: Security and Rights in U.S. Foreign Policy

Synopsis

This new analysis of governing ideas in U.S. foreign policy shows how they arise, are sustained and challenged both domestically and internationally, and become part of the world order. By focusing on U.S. policy toward the former Soviet Union and the United Nations through the years, Cathal Nolan sharply defines the central problem in policymaking---how to support principles of national security and democratic and human rights. This history with its outlook for the future is an important new interpretation of U.S. foreign policymaking.

Excerpt

In an interpretive survey of this type it is next to impossible to single out all one's intellectual debts. In many respects, the path I traveled was well-worn before me. Here and there I came upon a new bend or twist, but I was often aware of a host of companion minds traveling with me through diplomatic and political history. Where a particularly salient scholarly debt is recognized as owed, I have acknowledged that fact in the footnotes. The purpose of this preface, then, is to render thanks to those who most directly aided and influenced me in the course of writing this book.

My thanks to the Associates of the University of Toronto and the Center for International Studies, for research grants that enabled me to visit archives in Washington; the Connaught Foundation and SSHRC, who funded interviews in Geneva; the Human Rights Foundation for the Judge Harry Batshaw Fellowship; and the Department of Political Science at the University of British Columbia, which provided funding for completion of the study and a friendly and professional working atmosphere in a spectacularly beautiful natural setting. I am grateful to Jean Edward Smith of the University of Toronto. His clipped, trenchant criticisms were made (and received) in a spirit of friendly respect and genuine interest in improving the study. Thanks also to James Barros and Richard Gregor of the . . .

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