Taken for Granted: The Future of U.S.-British Relations

Taken for Granted: The Future of U.S.-British Relations

Taken for Granted: The Future of U.S.-British Relations

Taken for Granted: The Future of U.S.-British Relations

Synopsis

Veteran journalist and communications scholar Philip Seib examines the future of Anglo-American relations in the context of post-Cold War developments such as the restructuring of NATO and the growing importance of the European Union. After establishing the historical context of ties between the United States and Great Britain, Seib analyzes current and prospective security and economic issues, cultural links between the two countries, and the dynamics of bilateral cooperation in matters such as building peace in Northern Ireland. Professor Seib also suggests an agenda for strengthening these ties as the new millennium begins.

Excerpt

When I talk to American friends about this book, the reaction is almost always the same: "Sure, the Brits need us, but do we really need them?" British friends, on the other hand, say: "The Cold War is over, and we're building a new Europe. When will America realize that it no longer is the center of the universe?"

These comments should dispel any complacency about the future of one of the world's most important friendships. For more than 200 years, the ties between Great Britain and the United States have been much like those that bind a family--sometimes loosened by spats but never altogether undone, and always fundamentally reliable. Such long-lasting relationships between nations are rare; they should be nurtured, not neglected.

During much of this century, the United States and Great Britain have joined together to wage war and preserve peace. The overall record of these efforts is one of great success: common foes have been defeated by force of arms and by resolute diplomacy. Great Britain and the United States were not the only players on the winning side, but theirs was the most stable of the Western partnerships--a sturdy foundation on which much could be built.

But alliances that were highly valued in the past may seem of little . . .

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