America and Ireland, 1776-1976: The American Identity and the Irish Connection: the Proceedings of the United States Bicentennial Conference of Cumann Merriman, Ennis, August 1976

America and Ireland, 1776-1976: The American Identity and the Irish Connection: the Proceedings of the United States Bicentennial Conference of Cumann Merriman, Ennis, August 1976

America and Ireland, 1776-1976: The American Identity and the Irish Connection: the Proceedings of the United States Bicentennial Conference of Cumann Merriman, Ennis, August 1976

America and Ireland, 1776-1976: The American Identity and the Irish Connection: the Proceedings of the United States Bicentennial Conference of Cumann Merriman, Ennis, August 1976

Synopsis

Public, graduate, and upper-division undergraduate libraries should acquire this fine volume, which is unique in its field." - Choice

Excerpt

Ireland, a small nation on the western rim of Europe, and the United States, a vast continent-wide nation in North America, have had a disproportionately significant and intimate association. This volume of essays by more than a score of distinguished historians and critics from both sides of the Atlantic examines that association from several different perspectives. The bicentenary of American independence provided the occasion for this collaborative effort. In 1976, the Merriman Summer School--taking its name from the brilliant eighteenth-century Irish poet Brian Merriman, and held annually in County Clare, Ireland--devoted itself to the theme "Ireland and America, 1776-1976." The outcome is this intellectually exciting book, one sure to inform and challenge anyone interested in the history of the two countries.

Wisely, the aim of neither the organizers of the conference nor the editors of this volume has been unanimity or consensus. Rather, they have sought fresh thinking, new insights, the vitality of vigorous controversy. In this, they have succeeded. As with any good critical examination of the issues and state of knowledge in a given field, one concludes the reading of this book stimulated by the richness and complexity of what is known about the past and at the same time eager to learn the results of ongoing and future research.

The interplay between Ireland and the United States derives much of its character and color from the relationship of each of them to a third nation-- England. The thirteen states that formed the American nation were all English-speaking communities created by an outburst of English colonizing energy in the century and a quarter between the founding of Virginia in 1607 and Georgia in 1732. English naval and military successes ensured that despite earlier Spanish settlements in Florida and the Southwest, the new American nation would be English in its language and in many of its legal and political institutions.

The same thrusting English impulse for dominion and colonization that . . .

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